Posts Tagged 'Computer Science'

Free Computational Short Courses

The University of Virginia Alliance for Computational Science and Engineering (UVACSE) is again offering free Computational Short Courses.

All are welcome but the courses might be particularly useful to graduate students, faculty, and post-docs.

This Fall UVACSE is offering:

 

  • Introduction to Unix – 3 Oct 2013 – 4:00-6:00 pm
  • Bash Shell Scripting – 8 Oct 2013 – 4:00-6:00 pm
  • Introduction to Parallel R – 8 Oct 2013 – 4:00-6:00 pm
  • Introduction to the ITS Linux Clusters – 10 Oct 2013 – 4:00-6:00 pm
  • Parallel Computing in Mathematica – 14 Oct 2013 – 5:00-7:00 pm
  • Introduction to Python – 15 Oct 2013 – 4:00-6:00 pm
  • Parallel Computing in Matlab – 21 Oct 2013 – 5:30-7:30 pm
  • NumPy, SciPy, and Matplotlib – 22 Oct 2013 – 4:00-6:00 pm
  • Exploring Visualization with Matlab – 29 Oct 2013 – 4:00-6:00 pm

 

 

Registration is available online:

  • Go to the UVACSE webpage at: http://www.uvacse.virginia.edu/
  • Select the EVENTS tab at the top of the page.
  • On the EVENTS page, go to the month of October (Oct 2013), which will provide you with the schedule of the courses
  • Select the Short Course you wish to take.
  • This will take you to the BOOKINGS/EVENT page
  • Complete the booking for the short course at the bottom of the page

Memory Technology Scaling and Big Data

SPEAKER:                 Hillery Hunter

TOPIC:                       Can We Really Have That Many Bits? Memory Technology Scaling As It Collides With The Big Data Era

DATE:                        Wednesday, October 24

TIME:                         2:00 p.m. (Light refreshments after the seminar – Rice Hall 4th floor atrium)

PLACE:                      Rice Hall Auditorium (Room 130), University of Virginia

Abstract:  As computer architecture and system design move past the initial phases of the multi-core and virtualization eras, another hurdle is arising: Big Data.  Driven by ubiquitous data generation, from our smart phones and social media postings to security cameras and traffic sensors, Big Data means not just having but also analyzing large amounts of information.  The workloads of this new era will add stress to the main memory system, right around the time that technology scaling encounters new hurdles.  The “End of Scaling” has been declared numerous times — is this time any different?  From the lens of Big Data, this talk will take a look at memory technology scalability, discuss the opportunities of 3D stacking and new memory technologies, highlight key server requirements, and pose important areas for research in the coming era.

Bio: Hillery Hunter is the Systems Memory Strategist and Manager of the Systems Technology and Architecture Department at IBM’s T.J. Watson Research Center in Yorktown Heights, NY.  Her current work focuses on integrated approaches to solving the memory challenges of future computing systems.

Revolutionary Aerospace Systems Concepts – Academic Linkage (RASC-AL) Competition

Revolutionary Aerospace Systems Concepts – Academic Linkage (RASC-AL) is a student design competition that is sponsored by NASA and managed by the National Institute of Aerospace.  RASC-AL was formed to provide university-level engineering students with the opportunity to design projects based on NASA engineering challenges as well as offer NASA access to new research and design projects by students.

RASC-AL is open to undergraduate and graduate university-level students studying fields with applications to human space exploration (i.e., aerospace, bio-medical, electrical, and mechanical engineering; and life, physical, and computer sciences).  RASC-AL projects allow students to incorporate their coursework into real aerospace design concepts and work together in a team environment. Interdisciplinary teams are encouraged.

Through RASC-AL, student teams and their faculty advisors will work to develop mission architectures to employ innovative solutions in response to one of the 3 following themes:
  • Near Earth Asteroid (NEA) Flexible Mission Architecture Designs
  • Human-Focused Mars Mission Systems and Technologies
  • Human Lunar Access and Initial Exploration
BRAND NEW WAY TO PARTICIPATE IN 2013!

Teams can choose to participate in RASC-AL in one of two different ways:
  1. By developing a complete, integrated, end-to-end architecture addressing one of the three themes listed above (the traditional option); OR
  2. By performing a thorough system design of a supporting element such as a mobility system, habitat or lander (the advanced concept option).
In 2013, up to eighteen will be chosen to compete at the RASC-AL Forum in Cocoa Beach, Florida. Each team will receive a travel stipend to help defray the cost of attending the RASC-AL Forum. The teams with the top two winning papers will be invited to present their design projects to industry experts at a major Aerospace conference, such as Space 2013 (additional travel stipends provided).
Interested in RASC-AL?  Click here for more details.

Toward Proactive Mitigation of Advanced Multi-tier Botnets

Please make note of the following, free, on-line seminar.  Information about how to join the session can be found on the web site of the Commonwealth Graduate Engineering Program at  http://cgep.virginia.gov/gmu_webinar.php

Speaker

Brent ByungHoon Kang, Ph.D.

Topic

Toward Proactive Mitigation of Advanced Multi-tier Botnets

Date and Time

February 8, 2012 from 5 pm – 6 pm

Abstract

In this talk I will present our on-going efforts to mitigate the advanced botnets. Botnet is a network of compromised machines, exploited to carry out malicious acts such as spam, phishing, denial of service attacks, and stealing sensitive data such as passwords and banking credentials. The detection and mitigation of these botnets have proven to be quite challenging. Malware authors, supported by a thriving underground economy, have demonstrated professional quality sophistication in creating codes highly adaptive to existing mitigation efforts.

We have explored a series of botnet mitigation approaches directed toward (i) creating new analysis and de-obfuscation methods to rapidly expose the botnets’ command and control protocols in a timely manner, (ii) in-depth analysis to explore the fundamental limits and weaknesses of the advanced botnet architecture, and (iii) designing an effective enumerator (or “mapping” of bot networks) to locate bot-infected hosts on the Internet.

Our research direction fundamentally differs from existing Intrusion Detection System (IDS) approaches. Unlike IDS, which is geared towards protecting local hosts within its perimeter, an enumerator will enable identification of both local and remote infections. Identifying remote infections is crucial, given that there are numerous computers on the Internet that are not under the protection of IDS-based systems. The resulting enumeration has been used for spam blocking, firewall configuration, DNS rewriting, and alerting sys-admins regarding local infections.

Rice Hall Opens

Technology that could transform life as we know it and improve the human condition – that’s the vision behind the University of Virginia School of Engineering and Applied Science’s new Rice Hall Information Technology Engineering Building. The building will open at the beginning of the fall semester for classes.

The state-of-the-art space will allow faculty and students to conduct research and learn in such areas as high-performance computing, computer visualization, computer security, energy conservation, wireless communications, telemedicine, virtual reality, distributed multimedia and distance learning.

As the new home for the Department of Computer Science and the Computer Engineering Program, Rice Hall will also feature unique space for lab work, lectures and studying.

“This building is a huge step forward for the Engineering School,” said Dean James H. Aylor at Rice Hall’s groundbreaking in April 2009. “With labs and study areas designed for collaborative research, and facilities to enhance our distance-education programs, this building will benefit the Engineering School, the University and citizens of the commonwealth for years to come.”

The creation of Rice Hall was made possible by a lead gift of $10 million from Paul and Gina Rice, through the Rice Family Foundation.

On the Rice Hall website, Paul Rice, a 1975 electrical engineering alumnus, wrote: “The real promise of what will happen here is the 21st-century extension of the Academical Village and what will be made possible by the technologies that are used, developed and explored in these places. The village won’t simply exist then in these buildings or on this campus, but across the state, across the nation and globe. We have only really begun to understand the way in which these technologies can enhance human performance and accomplishment and how they can improve the human condition.”

Additional funding for the $65.5 million Rice Hall project came from U.Va., the state and from other U.Va. alumni and friends.

The building was designed by Bohlin Cynwinski Jackson and is being constructed by W.M. Jordan Company.

Located at the corner of Whitehead and Stadium roads behind Olsson Hall, Rice Hall consists of six stories covering 100,000 square feet. It is designed to be Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design-certified, commonly known as LEED. It also will be at the forefront of air and power technology, noted senior project manager Craig Hilten of Facilities Management.

Rice Hall’s “chilled beams” use water instead of air to remove heat from rooms – a new technology for University facilities. With sophisticated technologies for heating, cooling and lighting, and including energy recovery systems, Rice Hall also will function as a living laboratory on energy use.

When it opens, students and faculty going about their daily routines in the building will help researchers learn how to optimize the latest energy technologies for large buildings. The building’s instrumentation systems will collect data that will allow managers to optimize its energy consumption. The research also could inform behaviors, such as closing doors or powering down equipment to help reduce energy consumption.

Both undergraduate and graduate students will benefit from specialized lab spaces on all six floors. The largest is the Design Laboratory, located on the first floor, where Introduction to Engineering classes will be taught. With folding doors, it opens and connects to the courtyard, providing space for lab work that must be completed outside.

Also, space in the basement provides the appropriate environment for lab procedures that require specialized lighting. They include the Light Measurement Laboratory and the Visualization Lab.  The floors, ceilings and walls are black, reducing stray light and enhancing image presentation.

Equipped with enhanced audio and video capabilities, Rice Hall also supports the Engineering School’s distance-learning initiatives and teleconferencing – especially benefitting the PRODUCED in Virginia engineering program, in which students earn a four-year engineering degree from U.Va. while attending local community colleges.

Other features of Rice Hall include a 150-seat lecture hall, a cyber cafe, an Einstein’s Bagels eatery and a lobby – all located on the first floor.

Rice Hall will be formally dedicated Nov. 18.

=============================

Reposted from the Aug. 8, 2011 issue of UVa Today.  By Julia Wang.

Computer Chess

Studying Deep Blue: The History and Engineering behind Computer Chess By: Lawrence Aung

Article appears in the Vol. 11, Issue 3 edition of Illumin, the undergraduate engineering magazine from the University of Southern California.  View this issue at http://illumin.usc.edu/

Top Young Innovator

U.Va. Computer Scientist One of World’s Top Young Innovators, According to MIT Technology Review

August 27, 2010 — Kim Hazelwood, assistant professor of computer science at the University of Virginia’s School of Engineering and Applied Science, has been recognized by Technology Review magazine as one of the world’s top innovators under the age of 35.

The magazine, based at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, cited her work in developing a run-time adaptation tool that allows computers to rewrite software programs while they’re running.

A panel of expert judges and the editorial staff of Technology Review selected Hazelwood from more than 300 nominees. The annual “TR35” list includes young researchers who are changing the world through medicine, computing, communications, nanotechnology and more.

Read more at http://www.virginia.edu/uvatoday/newsRelease.php?id=12712


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