Posts Tagged 'Computer Science'



Roll-Up Computer

This from the recent AskBobRankin Geekly Update for 28 October 2009:

“The Rolltop computer is one of the coolest gadgets I’ve seen in a long time. It’s a laptop that literally rolls up like a newspaper, and unrolls into either a 17-inch flat screen or a tablet configuration. There’s just one problem, it only exists as a design concept. But the video is worth a look.”

Nuts and Bolts Editor’s Note:  Although just a “concept”, it is certainly an intriguing one!  Enjoy!  Getting to the video is a bit awkward, but click on Rolltop link above, then the link at the bottom of the resulting screen and be patient while the cookie displays!

Database of the Week: Inspec

Inspec includes bibliographic citations and indexed abstracts from publications in the fields of physics, electrical and electronic engineering, communications, computer science, control engineering, information technology, manufacturing and mechanical engineering, operations research, material science, oceanography, engineering mathematics, nuclear engineering, environmental science, geophysics, nanotechnology, biomedical technology and biophysics.  Coverage extends from 1969 to the present.

Inspec is a part of the Engineering Village suite of databases.  You may begin searching the database at Inspec.

Inspec is one of many information resources brought to you by the Brown Science and Engineering Library!  Ask for a demonstration of this database or about other resources that can help you work faster, smarter and better!

(Use of this database from this address restricted to University of Virginia users only.  Please contact a librarian for assistance, if you are having trouble connecting.)

Game World Talk

Disruptive Construction of Game Worlds

By Shane Liesegang of Bethesda Softworks

Thursday, October 29 at 2:00 p.m.

Where:  the Scholars’ Lab in Alderman Library

Please join us this Thursday, October 29th at 2:00 p.m. in the Scholars’ Lab for a talk on “Disruptive Construction of Game Worlds.”  Shane Liesegang, a game designer for Bethesda Softworks and a former game designer for Electronic Arts, will illustrate approaches to creating intricate and challenging virtual worlds in computer and video game environments.

All talks in the Scholars’ Lab are free and open to the public.  For a full listing of events in the Scholars’ Lab this semester, please visit http://lib.virginia.edu/scholarslab/about/events.html

Interface of the Future?

R. Clayton Miller envisions a new way to interact with desktop computers that replaces the mouse with a 10-finger touchpad system and overlapping windows with serial display of applications.  See a demo and learn more at the 10/GUI page on Vimeo or at 10gui.com.

Database of the Week: Computer and Information Systems Abstracts

Computer and Information Systems Abstracts provides a comprehensive monthly update on the latest theoretical research and practical applications around the world.  This database provides international coverage as well as coverage of numerous non-serial publications.  Sources covered include over 3,000 periodicals, conference proceedings, technical reports, trade journal/newsletter items, patents, books, and press releases.

For additional information, please see the Computer and Information Systems Abstracts Factsheet or begin searching the database at CSA Illumina.

Computer and Information Systems Abstracts is one of many information resources brought to you by the Brown Science and Engineering Library!  Ask for a demonstration of this database or about other resources that can help you work faster, smarter and better!

(Use of this database from this address restricted to University of Virginia users only.  Please contact a librarian for assistance, if you are having trouble connecting.)

Robotic Bees

Harvard Researchers Developing Robotic Bees.

Computerworld (10/8, Cooney) reports, “Harvard University researchers recently got a $10 million grant to create a colony of flying robotic bees, or RoboBees to among other things, spur innovation in ultra-low-power computing and electronic ‘smart’ sensors; and refine coordination algorithms to manage multiple, independent machines.”  The research “could lead to a better understanding of how to artificially mimic the unique collective behavior and intelligence of a bee colony; foster novel methods for designing and building an electronic surrogate nervous system able to deftly sense and adapt to changing environments; and advance work on the construction of small-scale flying mechanical devices,” according to the school.  “The bees will be made up of a variety of technologies including UV and optical sensors as well as pollination and docking capabilities, the researchers stated.  In addition, achieving autonomous flight will require compact high-energy power sources and associated electronics, integrated seamlessly into the ‘body’ of the machine, researchers stated.”

Reposted from the October 8, 2009 ASEE First Bell briefing.

DNA for Microchips

Excerpt from ASEE First Bell, August 18, 2009:

 CNET (8/18, Crothers) reports, “On Monday, IBM researchers and collaborator Paul W.K. Rothemund, of the California Institute of Technology (CalTech), announced an advancement of a method to arrange DNA origami structures on surfaces compatible with today’s semiconductor manufacturing equipment.” Spike Narayan, a manager in the Science & Technology division of IBM Research, stated that “the cost involved in shrinking (chip) features to improve performance is a limiting factor in keeping pace with Moore’s Law and a concern across the semiconductor industry.”      NewsFactor Business Report (8/18, LeClaire) reports that the “scientific advancement…could make way for the semiconductor industry to build more powerful, faster, tinier, more energy-efficient computer chips.” Rothemund and the IBM researchers “reported an advancement in combining lithographic patterning with self-assembly. This method of arranging DNA origami structures on surfaces compatible with today’s semiconductor manufacturing equipment could reduce production costs.”    PC Advisor (8/17, Shah) reported, “Big Blue is researching ways in which DNA can arrange itself into patterns on the surface of a chip, and then act as a kind of scaffolding on to which millions of tiny carbon nanotubes and nanoparticles are deposited.” That network, said IBM scientists, “could act as the wires and transistors on future computer chips.”   ITnews (8/18, Williams), and Silicon Republic (8/17, Kennedy) also reported the story.

CiteSeerX

CiteSeerx is a scientific literature digital library and search engine that focuses primarily on the literature in computer and information science. CiteSeerx aims to improve the dissemination of scientific literature and to provide improvements in functionality, usability, availability, cost, comprehensiveness, efficiency, and timeliness in the access of scientific and scholarly knowledge.  CiteSeerx provides citation searching and customizing options for ease in searching over a million documents.


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