Archive for February, 2012

Open Data Handbook

This handbook discusses the legal, social and technical aspects of open data. It can be used by anyone but is especially designed for those seeking to open up data. It discusses the why, what and how of open data – why to go open, what open is, and the how to ‘open’ data.

Read The Open Data Handbook here.

Copyright 201: Author’s Rights, Licensing, and Scholarly Communications

Thursday, March 1
4:00 p.m.
Scholars’ Lab, Alderman Library, University of Virginia

Madelyn Wessel
UVa Associate General Counsel

UVa Associate General Counsel Madelyn Wessel joins us in the Scholars’ Lab for her second talk on copyright and IP issues for grad students, faculty, and researchers. In this talk, Ms. Wessel will discuss scholars and publishers, open access, and open source.

Geocommons Workshop

Wednesday, February 29
10:00 – 11:00 a.m.
Brown Library Electronic Classroom
Clark Hall, University of Virginia

Repeats on:
Thursday, March 1
4:00 – 5:00 p.m.
Brown Library Electronic Classroom
Clark Hall, University of Virginia

Geocommons.com is a free online alternative to desktop GIS for mapping and analyzing your data. We’ll walk through the steps to upload data, make and share maps, and do analysis. We’ll focus on the advanced analysis tools offered through Geocommons. If you prefer Mac or PC, Firefox, Chrome, or IE, you’ll learn to use new web-based tools to make and share your maps with the world using your web browser. No Geographic Information Systems experience required.

ArcGIS Online Workshop

Wednesday, February 22
10:00 – 11:00 a.m.
Brown Library Electronic Classroom
Clark Hall, University of Virginia

Repeats on:
Thursday, February 23
4:00 – 5:00 p.m.
Brown Library Electronic Classroom
Clark Hall, University of Virginia

ArcGIS.com is a free online alternative to desktop GIS for mapping and analyzing your data. We’ll walk through the steps to upload data, make and share maps, and do analysis. If you prefer Mac or PC, Firefox, Chrome, or IE, you’ll learn to use new web-based tools to make and share your maps with the world using your web browser. No geographic information systems experience required.

Particle Discovery and the Role of Bayes in Design of Hypothesis Tests

Statistics Colloquium

Tuesday, Feb 21st at 4pm in Clark 107, University of Virginia

Speaker:  Richard Lockhart from Simon Fraser University

The discovery of the pentaquark, announced in Stepanyi et al (2003). Phys Rev Lett, 91, 252001, illustrates the problem of finding bumps in histograms as evidence of the existenceof hitherto  undetected particles.  The later retraction of a claim based on a P-valuebelow 3 parts in a billion illustrates the need for some care in designing hypothesis tests. I will discuss the Poisson process models used and the resulting tests for missing components in a mixture.  I propose to apply prior distributions describing the sought after bump and indicate the nature of resulting Neyman Pearson tests.  The discussion has a few features which I think merit attention: 1) I recommend the use of sample size dependent priors to design good tests; 2) I draw an analogy between this problem and goodness-of-fit; 3) I am led to test statistics whose asymptotic law is that of the integral of a log-Gaussian process. If I have time I will discuss the potential use of priors in testing ill-defined null hypotheses.

Microsoft Academic Search

Microsoft Academic Search (MAS) is a free academic search engine developed by Microsoft Research, which also serves as a test-bed for many research ideas in Data Mining, Named Entity Extraction and Disambiguation, Data Visualization, etc. As a research prototype, the coverage of MAS is still very limited in certain domains. We appreciate your feedback and contribution.

Microsoft Academic Search provides many innovative ways to explore academic publications, authors, conferences, journals, organizations and keywords, connecting millions of scholars, students, librarians, and other users.

Visit Microsoft Academic Search here.

Lethal Autonomous Robots and Responsibility

Science, Technology, and Society Program
Spring 2012 Colloquium Series
Date:  Thursday Feb. 23,  2012
Time:  3:30 – 5:00 p.m
Location:  Rodman Room, Thornton Hall, University of Virginia

In the second STS colloquium talk of 2012 Merel Noorman, a postdoc at the STS department, will present her current research on autonomous military robots and responsibility. One of the primary ethical concerns about future military robots is that these technologies will further obfuscate the distribution of responsibility, as they become more complex and increasingly capable of autonomous operation. Who will be held responsible when these robots make life and death decisions? In her talk, Merel will take a closer look at the discourse on autonomous military robots in order to explore how we can best address such concerns.


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