Archive for the 'Electrical Engineering' Category

Northrop Grumman Future Technical Leaders Program

If you are a U.S. citizen and are planning to graduate this year with either a M.S. or Ph.D., you might be interested in this opportunity.

Northrop Grumman Future Technical Leaders Program

Northrop Grumman is looking for the best new MS and PhD level engineers for their Future Technical Leaders Program. The FTL program is a fast-track, professional development opportunity formed with the objective of identifying, recruiting, hiring, developing, and retaining top Masters and PhDs candidates in the areas of science, technology and engineering.

 

A handful of graduates from the best schools in the country will be hired and groomed to be NG technical leaders of the future. The program initially involves rotational assignments in the company (three years working on a variety of critical projects that provide specialized training, networking opportunities, mentoring by senior technologists, and management visibility) and a very competitive salary.
Specific majors they are targeting are aerospace engineering, computer science, systems and information engineering, electrical and computer engineering, and computer engineering ; however, they are open to all.

Due to the classified nature of the work, candidates must be U.S. Citizens and able to obtain a security clearance.
Interested?  Please come and bring your resume.   Refreshments served.

 

Tuesday, September 10, 2013

7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

Olsson Hall, Room 120

**************************************
Pamela M. Norris, Ph.D
Associate Dean of Research and Graduate Programs
School of Engineering and Applied Science
Frederick Tracy Morse Professor
Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
University of Virginia
Thornton Hall, Room A110
122 Engineer’s Way
Charlottesville, VA 22904-4242
(434) 924-6295
FAX: (434) 982-3044
pamela@virginia.edu
http://faculty.virginia.edu/norris

Memory Technology Scaling and Big Data

SPEAKER:                 Hillery Hunter

TOPIC:                       Can We Really Have That Many Bits? Memory Technology Scaling As It Collides With The Big Data Era

DATE:                        Wednesday, October 24

TIME:                         2:00 p.m. (Light refreshments after the seminar – Rice Hall 4th floor atrium)

PLACE:                      Rice Hall Auditorium (Room 130), University of Virginia

Abstract:  As computer architecture and system design move past the initial phases of the multi-core and virtualization eras, another hurdle is arising: Big Data.  Driven by ubiquitous data generation, from our smart phones and social media postings to security cameras and traffic sensors, Big Data means not just having but also analyzing large amounts of information.  The workloads of this new era will add stress to the main memory system, right around the time that technology scaling encounters new hurdles.  The “End of Scaling” has been declared numerous times — is this time any different?  From the lens of Big Data, this talk will take a look at memory technology scalability, discuss the opportunities of 3D stacking and new memory technologies, highlight key server requirements, and pose important areas for research in the coming era.

Bio: Hillery Hunter is the Systems Memory Strategist and Manager of the Systems Technology and Architecture Department at IBM’s T.J. Watson Research Center in Yorktown Heights, NY.  Her current work focuses on integrated approaches to solving the memory challenges of future computing systems.

The Power of “Cabin Porn”: Producing and Consuming Electricity in Norwegian Leisure Cabins

Finn Arne Jørgensen
Rice Hall 128
University of Virginia
September 20, 2012, 3:30-5:00pm

The somewhat speculative phrase “cabin porn” reflects a growing international interest in cabins, shedworking, and rustic, exurban living off the grid – most of it romanticizing rural and low-tech lifestyles. A number of books, magazines, and websites (the most popular of the latter named simply “Cabin Porn”) encourage people to explore their inner Thoreau at their own cabin. The cabin has become an arena where people try to work out their ambivalent relationship to technology and all the bothersome things of modern life (including other people). The history of Norwegian cabins demonstrates what happens when this dream of more authentic living at the cabin comes true – very often, our wish for simplicity and comfort becomes a spearhead for technological upgrades. This talk will examine the question of electricity generation at the cabin, particularly focusing on the complex negotiations between consumers, commercial interests, property developers, available technological infrastructure (i.e. “the grid”), and cultural values about cabin living. The history of the Norwegian leisure cabin thus gives us insight into the unintended technological consequences of the dream of a simple life in nature.

Finn Arne Jørgensen is an assistant professor in history of technology and environment at Umeå University, Sweden, and a former visiting researcher at the UVA STS Department (2005-06). His first book, Making a Green Machine: The Infrastructure of Beverage Container Recycling, was published by Rutgers University Press in 2011. In this STS colloquium talk, he will present parts of his research on the history of the Norwegian leisure cabin, situating it within a larger international discussion of environment, technology, and society.

Control of Large Wind Turbines

Please attend the Lockheed-Martin sponsored ASSET seminar in Thornton Hall, Room E316, the University of Virginia, at 3:00 PM on Friday September 14, 2012.

Prof. Mark Balas, “Control of Large Wind Turbines: It Doesn’t Take a Weatherman to Know Which Way the Wind Blows”

Abstract: The next generation of utility-scale wind turbines will be larger and more flexible than earlier designs to promote greater energy capture and reduce the cost of energy.  It is here that the implementation of active feedback control is crucial to meet design objectives.  Not only must there be power regulation or optimization but also load mitigation to extend the life of the turbine.  Wind turbine dynamics modeling for active control is composed of four principal parts: (1) Aerodynamics and Inflow Behavior (2) Structural Dynamics (3) Feedback Control Algorithms and (4) Power Electronics.  Active control is a relatively new technology for wind turbines.  Basic control theory used in this talk is linear time-invariant and periodic control using disturbance accommodation, but with a strong connection to the aerodynamics and structural dynamics of wind turbines.  This talk will be a non-specialist’s tutorial on control of large wind turbines but will also introduce our adaptive control work in this research area.  I hope, when we are done, no one will ever be able to “kick sand in your face” about utility-sized wind turbine control.

This seminar is a great opportunity to broaden your base of knowledge, which can help spark new ideas in your own research, and could be invaluable in job interviews.  The Q&A based Fireside Chat session will be useful to learn best-current practices. Plan some questions for this distinguished faculty member.

More info:

Malathi Veeraraghavan

Professor, Charles L. Brown Dept. of Elec. & Comp. Engineering University of Virginia

1-434-982-2208

1-203-904-3724 (cell)

http://www.ece.virginia.edu/mv

Revolutionary Aerospace Systems Concepts – Academic Linkage (RASC-AL) Competition

Revolutionary Aerospace Systems Concepts – Academic Linkage (RASC-AL) is a student design competition that is sponsored by NASA and managed by the National Institute of Aerospace.  RASC-AL was formed to provide university-level engineering students with the opportunity to design projects based on NASA engineering challenges as well as offer NASA access to new research and design projects by students.

RASC-AL is open to undergraduate and graduate university-level students studying fields with applications to human space exploration (i.e., aerospace, bio-medical, electrical, and mechanical engineering; and life, physical, and computer sciences).  RASC-AL projects allow students to incorporate their coursework into real aerospace design concepts and work together in a team environment. Interdisciplinary teams are encouraged.

Through RASC-AL, student teams and their faculty advisors will work to develop mission architectures to employ innovative solutions in response to one of the 3 following themes:
  • Near Earth Asteroid (NEA) Flexible Mission Architecture Designs
  • Human-Focused Mars Mission Systems and Technologies
  • Human Lunar Access and Initial Exploration
BRAND NEW WAY TO PARTICIPATE IN 2013!

Teams can choose to participate in RASC-AL in one of two different ways:
  1. By developing a complete, integrated, end-to-end architecture addressing one of the three themes listed above (the traditional option); OR
  2. By performing a thorough system design of a supporting element such as a mobility system, habitat or lander (the advanced concept option).
In 2013, up to eighteen will be chosen to compete at the RASC-AL Forum in Cocoa Beach, Florida. Each team will receive a travel stipend to help defray the cost of attending the RASC-AL Forum. The teams with the top two winning papers will be invited to present their design projects to industry experts at a major Aerospace conference, such as Space 2013 (additional travel stipends provided).
Interested in RASC-AL?  Click here for more details.

IEEE Xplore Digital Library Enhancements

This week, the first IEEE documents in HTML became available in IEEE Xplore.

These first HTML articles mark the beginning of weekly additions of thousands of HTML-formatted documents to IEEE Xplore. By the end of 2012, you will see nearly 200,000 articles in this new format.

IEEE Xplore subscribers will automatically have access to the HTML versions of documents, as per existing subscription terms.

The dynamic new design redefines how IEEE publications are displayed online. Presenting cutting-edge IEEE articles from select publications in an elegant, state of the art, HTML layout provides a richer and more interactive research experience that allows you to:

  • Scan and interpret articles in under 60 seconds using “Quick Preview”
  • Navigate between sections of long articles with intuitive floating navigation
  • Effortlessly explore text, figures, equations, and multimedia files
  • Quickly view and copy mathematical equations, expressions, and formulas
  • Enhance your research with recommendations of related articles

The collection of articles available in HTML will build rapidly over the next several months, with a current focus on all IEEE journal content from 2001 to present. You will also start to see conference papers from 2001 and later in the new format by the end of this year. Magazine and Standards will follow in 2013, with over 2 million HTML articles available by the end of 2014.

Other new features also added to IEEE Xplore this month:

  • Share IEEE Xplore documents on social media sites
    Social media buttons now appear on all abstract pages so you can easily share links to IEEE Xplore articles through Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn.
  • Filter to only show content included in your subscription
    IEEE has expanded the popular search filter that allows users to “show only content in my subscription” to all IEEE Xplore subscriptions. You can find this filter on the search results page and in Advanced Search.
  • View a history for Top 100 Documents Downloaded by month
    Browse the most popular search terms and top downloaded documents by month plus see an archive of top downloaded documents from previous months.
  • Coming Soon: Save documents to Project Folders
    My Projects allows users to create personal project folders within IEEE Xplore to help organize documents by project or topic. Save documents to an unlimited number of folders, personalize with project descriptions, and add notes and tags to individual articles as you save them to projects. Sign in with your personal IEEE Account to access this feature.

University of Virginia readers may access IEEE Xplore from the Library’s Research Portal Page.

Clean Energy Competition

Have an idea for developing new energy technologies?

Want to show off UVa’s entrepreneurial talent?

As part of the Obama Administration’s effort to support the next generation of American clean energy entrepreneurs, the Department of Energy is offering $2 million to student-entrepreneurs for new clean energy solutions.  These funds will be awarded through a series of five regional competitions around the country.
Students at UVa and other universities in the Southeast are invited to compete in the ACC Clean Energy Challenge.  The winner of this challenge will receive a $100,000 prize and compete in the DOE National Clean Energy Business Plan Finals in Washington, D.C., in summer 2012.

To enter, you or your team should register at www.accnrg.org.

Key Dates and Steps:

23 March 2012      Executive Summary (3 pages) and an Investor Video Pitch (3-5 minutes) due.  (During this preliminary round, students compete with other teams from their university.)

10 April   Teams notified of advancement to Southeast Regional Competition.

20 April        Full Commercialization Plans due.

24-25 April    Fifteen teams gather at the University of Maryland to make 20-minute presentations and compete for top prizes.

For complete rules, visit http://www.mtech.umd.edu/accnrg/rules.html.

If you are a UVa student and planning to submit an entry, please contact Prof. Bernie Carlson, wc4p@virginia.edu, so that he can keep track of UVa’s participation.

APPA Student Research Grants/Internships

FROM:             Michele Suddleson, DEED Program Manager, American Public Power Association

It is my pleasure to inform you that the American Public Power Association (APPA) awards student research grants/internships each year to university students as part of its Demonstration of Energy-Efficient Developments (DEED) Program.  APPA is the service organization for the nation’s community-owned electric utilities.  DEED is APPA’s research program that funds innovative, energy related research.

Please assist us in notifying your students about our opportunities by posting copies of our student flyer in prominent locations at your university, sending out on appropriate university list servers, and providing copies of the notice to your university’s student financial aid office.  Below is a brief synopsis of the scholarships we offer.

Ten  $4,000 Student Research Grants/Internships

Ten $4,000 student research grants/internships are awarded each year to undergraduate/graduate university students to conduct research on a project/internship in conjunction with a DEED member utility or as part of the students’ curriculum requirements if approved by a DEED member.  A mid-project report, final report, and abstract are required.  A sample Grant/Internship application can be found here.

Annual Application Deadlines: February 15 and October 15

One $5,000 Technical Design Project (Research Grant)

DEED awards one Technical Design Project each year to a student or group of students studying in an energy related discipline.  This grant is geared towards engineering students working on their senior project.  The student(s) academic advisor must approve the project and a mid-project report, final report, and abstract are required.  Travel expenses (up to $3,000) are also included in this grant for the student(s) to present their work at APPA’s Engineering and Operations Technical Conference held each spring.  A sample Technical Design Project application can be found here.

Annual Application Deadline:  October 15

Applications offered here are only to be used as a sample of the questions and information that will be required as we are launching a on-line application process January 3, 2012.

For more information connect to DEED’s scholarship information on APPA’s DEED website, or contact DEED program staff at 202-467-2960 or DEED@PublicPower.org.

 

Rice Hall Opens

Technology that could transform life as we know it and improve the human condition – that’s the vision behind the University of Virginia School of Engineering and Applied Science’s new Rice Hall Information Technology Engineering Building. The building will open at the beginning of the fall semester for classes.

The state-of-the-art space will allow faculty and students to conduct research and learn in such areas as high-performance computing, computer visualization, computer security, energy conservation, wireless communications, telemedicine, virtual reality, distributed multimedia and distance learning.

As the new home for the Department of Computer Science and the Computer Engineering Program, Rice Hall will also feature unique space for lab work, lectures and studying.

“This building is a huge step forward for the Engineering School,” said Dean James H. Aylor at Rice Hall’s groundbreaking in April 2009. “With labs and study areas designed for collaborative research, and facilities to enhance our distance-education programs, this building will benefit the Engineering School, the University and citizens of the commonwealth for years to come.”

The creation of Rice Hall was made possible by a lead gift of $10 million from Paul and Gina Rice, through the Rice Family Foundation.

On the Rice Hall website, Paul Rice, a 1975 electrical engineering alumnus, wrote: “The real promise of what will happen here is the 21st-century extension of the Academical Village and what will be made possible by the technologies that are used, developed and explored in these places. The village won’t simply exist then in these buildings or on this campus, but across the state, across the nation and globe. We have only really begun to understand the way in which these technologies can enhance human performance and accomplishment and how they can improve the human condition.”

Additional funding for the $65.5 million Rice Hall project came from U.Va., the state and from other U.Va. alumni and friends.

The building was designed by Bohlin Cynwinski Jackson and is being constructed by W.M. Jordan Company.

Located at the corner of Whitehead and Stadium roads behind Olsson Hall, Rice Hall consists of six stories covering 100,000 square feet. It is designed to be Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design-certified, commonly known as LEED. It also will be at the forefront of air and power technology, noted senior project manager Craig Hilten of Facilities Management.

Rice Hall’s “chilled beams” use water instead of air to remove heat from rooms – a new technology for University facilities. With sophisticated technologies for heating, cooling and lighting, and including energy recovery systems, Rice Hall also will function as a living laboratory on energy use.

When it opens, students and faculty going about their daily routines in the building will help researchers learn how to optimize the latest energy technologies for large buildings. The building’s instrumentation systems will collect data that will allow managers to optimize its energy consumption. The research also could inform behaviors, such as closing doors or powering down equipment to help reduce energy consumption.

Both undergraduate and graduate students will benefit from specialized lab spaces on all six floors. The largest is the Design Laboratory, located on the first floor, where Introduction to Engineering classes will be taught. With folding doors, it opens and connects to the courtyard, providing space for lab work that must be completed outside.

Also, space in the basement provides the appropriate environment for lab procedures that require specialized lighting. They include the Light Measurement Laboratory and the Visualization Lab.  The floors, ceilings and walls are black, reducing stray light and enhancing image presentation.

Equipped with enhanced audio and video capabilities, Rice Hall also supports the Engineering School’s distance-learning initiatives and teleconferencing – especially benefitting the PRODUCED in Virginia engineering program, in which students earn a four-year engineering degree from U.Va. while attending local community colleges.

Other features of Rice Hall include a 150-seat lecture hall, a cyber cafe, an Einstein’s Bagels eatery and a lobby – all located on the first floor.

Rice Hall will be formally dedicated Nov. 18.

=============================

Reposted from the Aug. 8, 2011 issue of UVa Today.  By Julia Wang.

Certain Core Competencies Can Help Software Engineers Stand Out

In the “Career Management” blog at Tech Republic (1/21), Head Blogs Editor Toni Bowers writes that, according to CareerCast, software engineer is “the hottest job for 2011.” For those “who would like to know how to stand out from the pack” in this competitive field, Bowers lists “five core skills to help build critical competencies.” The list, created by Bruce Douglas, “Chief Evangelist from IBM Rational,” includes electric vehicle mechanics, probability and statistics, environmental engineering, engineering economics, and ethics.

Reposted from the 1/21/11 ASEE First Bell.


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