Archive for the 'Journal Articles' Category

SIAM Newsletter

The September issue of SIAM Unwrapped, the newsletter of the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics, is now available for download.  See

SIAM Unwrapped – September 2013

News & announcements for the SIAM membership community

Download a PDF version

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Undergraduate Research Publication

The Spectra is once again accepting undergraduate research submissions. Publication in The Spectra is a great way to highlight your undergraduate achievements and give yourself experience in research writing. Original research from undergraduate students of any year will be accepted until Monday, Oct. 1. You are encouraged to take advantage of this opportunity.  More information can be found at www.seas.virginia.edu/pubs/spectra/.

Copyright 201: Author’s Rights, Licensing, and Scholarly Communications

Thursday, March 1
4:00 p.m.
Scholars’ Lab, Alderman Library, University of Virginia

Madelyn Wessel
UVa Associate General Counsel

UVa Associate General Counsel Madelyn Wessel joins us in the Scholars’ Lab for her second talk on copyright and IP issues for grad students, faculty, and researchers. In this talk, Ms. Wessel will discuss scholars and publishers, open access, and open source.

Microsoft Academic Search

Microsoft Academic Search (MAS) is a free academic search engine developed by Microsoft Research, which also serves as a test-bed for many research ideas in Data Mining, Named Entity Extraction and Disambiguation, Data Visualization, etc. As a research prototype, the coverage of MAS is still very limited in certain domains. We appreciate your feedback and contribution.

Microsoft Academic Search provides many innovative ways to explore academic publications, authors, conferences, journals, organizations and keywords, connecting millions of scholars, students, librarians, and other users.

Visit Microsoft Academic Search here.

Tips on Publishing Your Research

Publishing Your Research 101 Video Series

The effective communication of scientific research is vital both to the scientific community and to a scientist’s career. ACS Publications (American Chemical Society) has launched the Publishing Your Research 101 video series to assist authors and reviewers in understanding and improving their experience with the processes of writing, submitting, editing, and reviewing manuscripts.

Who should listen? If you are writing your first research publication, then this series is definitely for you. If you have submitted articles in the past, but would like to improve your skills, then you would benefit from following this series. If you would like to know more about the scholarly communication process, then you will surely find some of these episodes to be of interest. If you are a faculty member or librarian, and are looking for ways to help your students become authors and reviewers, then this series will offer some useful material to build on.

Videos will be released monthly discussing topics such as selecting a journal for submission, writing a good cover letter, suggesting reviewers, responding to reviewer comments and manuscript rejections, tips for non-native English speakers, and more.

You can view the series at the ACS web site http://pubs.acs.org/page/publish-research/index.html

Libra – The New Digital Repository for UVa

The following article is reposted from the August 1, 2011 issue of UVa Today.

New Online Service Preserves, Promotes Digital Faculty Scholarship

July 29, 2011 — The University of Virginia Library has developed a new service to preserve faculty scholarly work and make it easily accessible online.

Libra, a new digital repository, is designed to archive U.Va. faculty articles and scholarship from any discipline in a searchable database, said Martha Sites, deputy university librarian. The service will also host student theses and dissertations, as well as research data sets.

“It provides a way for scholars to ensure the long-term durability of the scholarship they produce,” Sites said. “That’s the overarching goal.”

Digital technology makes it easier to disseminate scholarly work, but it has also created unforeseen preservation problems, she said. Even if a journal or publisher posts an important scholarly article online, there’s no guarantee it will stay there for the long run. And if an article was born in a digital format – meaning  no print version exists – it could potentially be lost forever if a server crashes or the publication folds, Sites said.

“It is a problem in the digital realm that doesn’t exist in the same way in the print realm, in that the best ways to manage digital content over time and through changes in technology are not yet well understood,” she said.

Libra will provide a stable, long-term home for U.Va. scholarship that isn’t tied to a commercial endeavor, said James Hilton, vice president and chief information officer. More and more institutions are heading down similar paths, he said.

“It’s completely appropriate for academic research libraries to be developing these tools and providing these solutions, because they are the only ones charged with the mission of preserving the scholarly record forever,” Hilton said.

When a library buys a physical book, it has the right to loan that book out and preserve it indefinitely, Hilton said. But when it obtains an electronic item, such as a digital copy of a scholarly article, the library only has a license, which – unless the contract says otherwise – doesn’t include the right to preserve it.

“What I think is beautiful about Libra is that it places control in the hands of scholars,” Hilton said.

University faculty members who use Libra are responsible for securing publishing rights to their work and uploading it. Instructions are available on the site.

School of Medicine neurology professor Ivan Login, the first faculty member to upload his work to Libra, said the service could become a powerful tool for scholars who need free access to published research.

“Part of the value of Libra is that it gives faculty members a place to put their papers where the world can get at them without having to pay,” Login said. “The repository allows these articles to be available, if you know where to look for them.”

Sites said Libra was developed in conjunction with Faculty Senate efforts to increase access to scholarly works. Last year, the senate approved a policy designed to encourage scholars to retain rights to publish their research findings online a year after the articles are published in academic journals.

Law professor Edmund Kitch, who served on the Faculty Senate’s Task Force on Scholarly Publication and Authors’ Rights, said many publishers have been cooperative with that process. In some cases, the authors already own publication rights for important pieces of scholarship, he said.

In addition, uploading articles to Libra assures worldwide distribution of work that could otherwise be hard to find, he said.

“It’s a reality that many important scholarly journals are very expensive and have very limited distribution,” Kitch said. “There are millions of people who have no way of getting at the scholarly literature at the present time. If you have a piece of scholarship on Libra, it can be accessed by anyone with an Internet connection throughout the world.”

The library partnered with Information Technology Services to create the site’s infrastructure, and library staff is currently working to make Libra materials searchable through Virgo, the library’s primary search portal. Beta testing for the inclusion of data sets, dissertations and graduate theses should begin in coming months, Sites said.

In the future, online repositories such as Libra could be an important step toward larger digital scholarship repositories that span many institutions, Hilton said.

“In my view, digital preservation efforts are going to increasingly play a role in the life of premier research libraries,” he said.

— By Rob Seal

Contact:

Rob Seal
U.Va. Media Relations
434-243-3492
rseal@virginia.edu

All-New Virgo Library Catalog

Now You Can Search for Books AND Journal Articles At the Same Time!

The University Library catalog, Virgo, has been greatly enhanced to include journal articles from many publishers. It features a simple and fast search engine that helps you discover relevant information on any topic from the University of Virginia Library collections. Virgo is the place to start your research in scholarly journal and newspaper articles, books, videos, maps, manuscript collections, music scores and more. From your search results page, one click will display the full text of an article or tell you whether or not a book is on the shelf.

Virgo’s new integrated article search is part of a suite of online services the Library offers to researchers through the new Research Portal which provides access to the specialist databases – the recommended approach for those who are working on in-depth literature reviews.

For more information about the new Virgo interface or the Research Portal stop by any UVa Library or contact your subject librarian.

 


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