Posts Tagged 'Transportation'

TRID: Leveraging Search Results with Reference Management Tools

TRB will conduct a webinar on October 8, 2013 from 2:00 p.m.- 3:30 p.m. ET that will demonstrate the use of desktop and online reference management tools. Participants must register in advance of the webinar, there are no professional credits associated with this webinar, and there is no fee to registerRegister at http://www.trb.org/Research/Blurbs/169269.aspx

The licensed and free management tools that will be covered are EndNote, EndNote Web, RefWorks, and Zotero.

TRID, released in 2011, is the world’s largest and most comprehensive bibliographic resource on transportation research information. TRID is an integrated database that combines the records from TRB’s Transportation Research Information Services (TRIS) Database and the OECD’s Joint Transport Research Centre’s International Transport Research Documentation (ITRD) Database. TRID provides access to more than one million records of transportation research worldwide, with more than 90,000 links to free or fee-based full text.

The first 60 minutes of the webinar will feature information from the presenter and the final 30 minutes is reserved for audience questions.

Webinar Presenters:

  • Bill McLeod, Transportation Research Board
  • Ken Winters, Virginia Department of Transportation

Moderated by: Lisa Berardi Marflak, Transportation Research Board

Learning Objectives:

  • To learn how to export references from TRID to an EndNote library or database; an EndNote Web account; a RefWorks database; and to a Zotero Library
  • To understand the labor and time-saving benefits of using reference management tools to write papers, chapters, and technical documentation

To ensure that you receive notices about upcoming webinars, please subscribe to the TRB Transportation Research E-Newsletter.

Registration information:  
There is no fee to register for this webinar. After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.  See link above to register.

Registration questions? Contact Reggie Gillum at RGillum@nas.edu.

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THE LONG TERM CHALLENGE TO CIVIL AVIATION PROPULSION

Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

Fall 2012 Seminar Series

Thursday, September 13 4-5 pm in MEC – 341

University of Virginia

 

Professor Riti Singh

Department of Power and Propulsion

Cranfield University, UK

The confluence of the growth of civil aviation and the need to limit its impact on climate change is set to bring the aerospace industry to its tryst with destiny. Anticipated large improvements in propulsion systems, airframes and operations are likely to be offset by market growth, not least by increasing demands from the BRIC economies. This presentation will focus on propulsion system developments within civil aviation. A drive to improve thermal and propulsive efficiencies still promises significant improvements. Bio‐mix ‘drop‐in’ fuels are likely in the next 20 years and offer further improvements. In the longer term, we are likely to see a shift to distributed propulsion to further improve both propulsive efficiency and air frame performance. This may result in a few very high‐efficiency generators, to drive a large number of small electric fans. Such a scenario opens up the possibility of significant advances with the ability to have ‘clean air frames’. In the long term, the growth of civil aviation may have to be curtailed, in spite of growing market demand. A way forward could be the combination of hydrogen and other technologies, including the intriguing possibility of an aircraft being able to produce global warming or cooling at will, perhaps allowing mankind to control the earth’s temperature by the use of civil aviation.

 Professor Riti Singh

Riti Singh is Professor Emeritus of Cranfield University. He leads the Gas Turbine Engineering & Technology Group within the Department of Power and Propulsion and is Director of the Rolls‐Royce University Technology Centre in Performance Engineering. He has given many plenary/keynote speeches. He holds numerous patents, and has published widely. His research has been strongly supported by industry, the European Union and EPSRC. Professor Singh has an interest in novel cycles for power and propulsion, particularly in the context of the environment. He has received many accolades during the course of his career, the most recent being ASME’s International Gas Turbine Institute’s Annual International Aircraft Engine Technology Award for 2010, presented to one individual each year for sustained, innovative personal contribution to the field. Professor Singh is a past chairman of the Aerospace Division and continues his involvement s a board member of this and the International Society of Air Breathing Engines. (ISABE).Professor Singh has consulted for over 40 organisations, including gas turbine manufacturers.

Car “Platooning”

New Scientist (1/18, Graham-Rowe) reported on a road test of an automatic driving system in Sweden that showed “that a single car could join a platoon, be ‘enslaved’ by a lead truck” and become part of a convoy “and then exit safely.” As a result, “discussions are now under way to carry out tests on public roads in Spain next year.” The system, known as “platooning,” was tested by Volvo, “one of the partners of the Safe Road Trains for the Environment (SARTRE) Project” coordinated by the Cambridge engineering firm Ricardo UK, which has “€6.4 million of European Commission money” for it. The system would theoretically let “drivers read a book, surf the net or possibly even have a snooze while behind the wheel.” The SARTRE project aims to operate “platoons on public highways without having to change the infrastructure.”

Reposted from the 1/19/11 ASEE First Bell

NTIS Newsletter Highlights Civil Engineering and Transportation

The November 15, 2009 issue of the NTIS Technical Reports Newsletter highlights reports dealing with civil engineering and transportation topics.  This newsletter is designed “To bring you a sampling of the latest documents added to the NTIS Database and to help you gain a greater understanding of the wealth of scitech information available from the National Technical Information Service.”  The National Technical Information Service (NTIS), is the nation’s largest and most comprehensive source of government-funded scientific, technical, engineering and business-related information.  You can access this issue of the NTIS Newsletter at http://www.ntis.gov/pdf/ntrnews2-5.pdf or subscribe to receive future issues.

NOTE:  You will not be able to access the full text of reports from the above link.  Please check VIRGO for desired items or request needed items using Interlibrary Loan.  You may also find that searching for NTIS reports from within the Engineering Village suite of databases provides you with more detailed abstracts and other information about the reports.  You will still need to rely on other means to access full text, however.

A Robot for My Co-Pilot

In-Dash Robot Uses Facial Expressions To Communicate With Driver

The Wired (11/17, Squatriglia) “Autopia” blog reported, “Audi and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology envision a future where robots riding shotgun make us happier, safer drivers and create a ‘symbiotic relationship’ between car and driver.”  The robot, called Affective Intelligent Driving Agent, or Aida, “would analyze our driving habits, keeping track of frequent routes and destinations to provide real-time traffic info, and make friendly suggestions along the way,” as well as “give gentle reminders to buckle up, watch our speed or slow down for that school bus up ahead.”  The robot “uses a small laser video projector to convey facial expressions and other information.”  Having “human-like motion” and the ability to express emotions, researchers say, “makes it easier to convey information,” since “reading a facial expression is instantaneous.”  The researchers “plan to build a driving simulator for a controlled study” by next year, and “real-world tests will follow in 2011.”

Reposted from the November 18, 2009 ASEE First Bell briefing.

Database of the Week: Mechanical and Transportation Engineering Abstracts

CSA Mechanical & Transportation Engineering Abstracts provides citations, abstracts, and indexing of the serials literature in mechanical and transportation engineering and their complementary fields, including forensic engineering, management and marketing of engineering services, engineering education, theoretical mechanics and dynamics, and mathematics and computation.  This database provides in depth, comprehensive coverage of the international engineering literature as well as numerous non-serial publications.  Many of the more recent records in the database include fields containing cited references, corresponding authorés e-mail address, and publisher contact information.  Sources covered include over 3,000 periodicals, conference proceedings, technical reports, trade journal/newsletter items, patents, books, and press releases.

For additional information, please see the CSA Mechanical and Transportation Engineering Abstracts database Factsheet or begin searching the database at CSA Illumina.

The CSA Mechanical and Transportation Engineering Abstracts database is one of many information resources brought to you by the Brown Science and Engineering Library!  Ask for a demonstration of this database or about other resources that can help you work faster, smarter and better!

(Use of this database from this address restricted to University of Virginia users only.  Please contact a librarian for assistance, if you are having trouble connecting.)

Sustainable Transportation Seminar

CIVIL AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING SEMINAR SERIES

Maglev: Sustainable Transport For The 21st Century & Beyond

Kevin C. Coates

Executive Director, North American Maglev Transport Institute (NAMTI)

Friday, October 30, 2009

120 Olsson Hall

2:00 PM 

Abstract

America’s highways and airports are overcrowded. Suburban sprawl continues unabated. Oil, gas and electricity prices spike and then plummet, throwing world economies into uncertainty.  This cycle will continue, and likely intensify as long as political and industry leaders attempt to apply old solutions in the face of continued explosive growth.   The nearly simultaneous convergence of rapidly increasing world demand for energy and increasing demands on transportation systems will eventually force America to reassess its present land development and transportation policies. America must find ways to link any new policy with more sustainable energy and transportation solutions.

Augmenting the existing car/air travel duopoly will not be easy, but without high capacity passenger (rail or maglev) modes between cities, intercity travel will continue to become more and more difficult. For many cities in the U.S., traffic levels are already unacceptable and the situation continues to deteriorate. If America is to regain its competitive edge, an important step must be to adopt more workable and sustainable transportation solutions.

High-speed magnetic levitation transportation is the first logical step industrialized countries can take to free themselves from short haul air travel between city pairs and reliance on oil for intercity travel.  Non-contact maglev technology is a faster, safer, and more cost effective alternative to steel wheel rail technology. The technology lasts longer, costs less, and has much lower environmental impact than traditional high-speed rail or short haul air travel.

The CEE seminar series is open to the University community.  CE undergraduate students are especially invited to attend.

Refreshments served at 3:00 PM in THN D204 (CEE Lounge)


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