Posts Tagged 'Scholarly Publishing'

Undergraduate Research Publication

The Spectra is once again accepting undergraduate research submissions. Publication in The Spectra is a great way to highlight your undergraduate achievements and give yourself experience in research writing. Original research from undergraduate students of any year will be accepted until Monday, Oct. 1. You are encouraged to take advantage of this opportunity.  More information can be found at www.seas.virginia.edu/pubs/spectra/.

Data Rights and Responsibilities

Wednesday, March 28
2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.
Brown Library Electronic Classroom (Room 133), Clark Hall
University of Virginia

Madelyn Wessel
Associate General Counsel

David Hudson
Associate Vice Provost for Research

Madelyn Wessel, Associate General Counsel, and David Hudson, Associate Vice Provost for Research, will discuss what you need to know about ownership of your research data. This talk will explore information from the Data Rights and Responsibilities document from the Brown Library website. Refreshments will be served.

This event is co-sponsored by the Scientific Data Consulting Group and Scholars’ Lab.

Please RSVP on our Facebook event page.

Planned Obsolescence: Publishing, Technology, and the Future of the Academy

Kathleen Fitzpatrick talk – start time moved to 2:00 p.m.

Scholar’s Lab, Alderman Library

In case you missed our other announcements to this effect, we wanted to make sure you were aware that the start time of Kathleen Fitzpatrick’s talk “Planned Obsolescence: Publishing, Technology, and the Future of the Academy” was moved to 2:00 p.m.  For more on her talk, please see the SLab event calendar.  We hope to see you there!

All Scholars’ Lab events are free and open to all. No registration is required.

We hope to see you in the Scholars’ Lab! And check out our full calendar of coming events.

Copyright 201: Author’s Rights, Licensing, and Scholarly Communications

Thursday, March 1
4:00 p.m.
Scholars’ Lab, Alderman Library, University of Virginia

Madelyn Wessel
UVa Associate General Counsel

UVa Associate General Counsel Madelyn Wessel joins us in the Scholars’ Lab for her second talk on copyright and IP issues for grad students, faculty, and researchers. In this talk, Ms. Wessel will discuss scholars and publishers, open access, and open source.

Graduate Student Research Skills Workshop — Copyright Essentials

Graduate Student Research Skills Workshop

Tuesday, Feb. 7, 3:30-5, Rice Hall Auditorium (Room 130 Rice Hall)

University of Virginia

Please join your fellow SEAS graduate students in this, the inaugural, Research Skills Workshop.  The topic—-Copyright Essentials.

With the Engineering School’s implementation in 2012 of a new digital-only deposit program for master’s theses and dissertations,  Engineering graduate students must address enhanced responsibilities for copyright, grants compliance, and other traditional author’s issues of privacy, defamation, and related concerns. Students will be required to sign a formal deposit license with the University Library as part of their degree completion process, and all theses and dissertations will be available worldwide.  Good advance planning and awareness of key copyright and other legal requirements are more essential than ever before. Madelyn Wessel from the Office of General Counsel will be here to talk about the library deposit license and the new Copyright Essentials materials that have been prepared to assist Engineering School students with this new program.  Some of the ways students can protect and share their scholarly and research works via Creative Commons and Open Source licensing, and other author’s rights issues will also be discussed.  The workshop will provide ample opportunities for Q & A.

Look for future announcements and other opportunities to learn and enhance your research skills in this new, monthly workshop series for the entire SEAS Community of Scholars.

Brought to you by the Graduate Student Module of the Strategic Plan Implementation Team and the Office of the Associate Dean of Research and Graduate Programs

Copyright 101: An Introduction to Copyright in a Digital Age

Wednesday, February 8
4:00 – 5:00 p.m.
Scholars’ Lab, Alderman Library 4th Floor

University Associate General Council Madelyn Wessel will join us in the Scholars’ Lab for the first of a series of four talks on the basics of current US copyright law and practice for scholars and researchers where she will discuss fair use and multimedia in the classroom and on the web.

Tips on Publishing Your Research

Publishing Your Research 101 Video Series

The effective communication of scientific research is vital both to the scientific community and to a scientist’s career. ACS Publications (American Chemical Society) has launched the Publishing Your Research 101 video series to assist authors and reviewers in understanding and improving their experience with the processes of writing, submitting, editing, and reviewing manuscripts.

Who should listen? If you are writing your first research publication, then this series is definitely for you. If you have submitted articles in the past, but would like to improve your skills, then you would benefit from following this series. If you would like to know more about the scholarly communication process, then you will surely find some of these episodes to be of interest. If you are a faculty member or librarian, and are looking for ways to help your students become authors and reviewers, then this series will offer some useful material to build on.

Videos will be released monthly discussing topics such as selecting a journal for submission, writing a good cover letter, suggesting reviewers, responding to reviewer comments and manuscript rejections, tips for non-native English speakers, and more.

You can view the series at the ACS web site http://pubs.acs.org/page/publish-research/index.html

Libra – The New Digital Repository for UVa

The following article is reposted from the August 1, 2011 issue of UVa Today.

New Online Service Preserves, Promotes Digital Faculty Scholarship

July 29, 2011 — The University of Virginia Library has developed a new service to preserve faculty scholarly work and make it easily accessible online.

Libra, a new digital repository, is designed to archive U.Va. faculty articles and scholarship from any discipline in a searchable database, said Martha Sites, deputy university librarian. The service will also host student theses and dissertations, as well as research data sets.

“It provides a way for scholars to ensure the long-term durability of the scholarship they produce,” Sites said. “That’s the overarching goal.”

Digital technology makes it easier to disseminate scholarly work, but it has also created unforeseen preservation problems, she said. Even if a journal or publisher posts an important scholarly article online, there’s no guarantee it will stay there for the long run. And if an article was born in a digital format – meaning  no print version exists – it could potentially be lost forever if a server crashes or the publication folds, Sites said.

“It is a problem in the digital realm that doesn’t exist in the same way in the print realm, in that the best ways to manage digital content over time and through changes in technology are not yet well understood,” she said.

Libra will provide a stable, long-term home for U.Va. scholarship that isn’t tied to a commercial endeavor, said James Hilton, vice president and chief information officer. More and more institutions are heading down similar paths, he said.

“It’s completely appropriate for academic research libraries to be developing these tools and providing these solutions, because they are the only ones charged with the mission of preserving the scholarly record forever,” Hilton said.

When a library buys a physical book, it has the right to loan that book out and preserve it indefinitely, Hilton said. But when it obtains an electronic item, such as a digital copy of a scholarly article, the library only has a license, which – unless the contract says otherwise – doesn’t include the right to preserve it.

“What I think is beautiful about Libra is that it places control in the hands of scholars,” Hilton said.

University faculty members who use Libra are responsible for securing publishing rights to their work and uploading it. Instructions are available on the site.

School of Medicine neurology professor Ivan Login, the first faculty member to upload his work to Libra, said the service could become a powerful tool for scholars who need free access to published research.

“Part of the value of Libra is that it gives faculty members a place to put their papers where the world can get at them without having to pay,” Login said. “The repository allows these articles to be available, if you know where to look for them.”

Sites said Libra was developed in conjunction with Faculty Senate efforts to increase access to scholarly works. Last year, the senate approved a policy designed to encourage scholars to retain rights to publish their research findings online a year after the articles are published in academic journals.

Law professor Edmund Kitch, who served on the Faculty Senate’s Task Force on Scholarly Publication and Authors’ Rights, said many publishers have been cooperative with that process. In some cases, the authors already own publication rights for important pieces of scholarship, he said.

In addition, uploading articles to Libra assures worldwide distribution of work that could otherwise be hard to find, he said.

“It’s a reality that many important scholarly journals are very expensive and have very limited distribution,” Kitch said. “There are millions of people who have no way of getting at the scholarly literature at the present time. If you have a piece of scholarship on Libra, it can be accessed by anyone with an Internet connection throughout the world.”

The library partnered with Information Technology Services to create the site’s infrastructure, and library staff is currently working to make Libra materials searchable through Virgo, the library’s primary search portal. Beta testing for the inclusion of data sets, dissertations and graduate theses should begin in coming months, Sites said.

In the future, online repositories such as Libra could be an important step toward larger digital scholarship repositories that span many institutions, Hilton said.

“In my view, digital preservation efforts are going to increasingly play a role in the life of premier research libraries,” he said.

— By Rob Seal

Contact:

Rob Seal
U.Va. Media Relations
434-243-3492
rseal@virginia.edu

Visual Data in Scientific Publishing

Kirsten Miles
Research Computing Support Specialist
Monday, April 12, 2010, from 4:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.
In the Brown Science and Engineering Library Electronic Classroom

This session will cover an assortment of issues relating to the use of images as data in scientific publishing.  Particular attention will be given to ethical concerns arising within certain fields, and how to ensure that processes are adequately tracked and managed.

You can register for this course by submitting a help ticket at http://www2.lib.virginia.edu/brown/rescomp/help/index.html

This event is part of the Spring 2010 Research Computing Lab Short Course Series.

Paperless Learning

Publishers Reach Deals For iPad-Compatible Textbooks.

The Wall Street Journal (2/2, Trachtenberg, Kane) reported that a number of textbook publishers have reportedly reached an agreement with software company ScrollMotion to make versions of their textbooks available electronically, with devices such as the new iPad in mind. A McGraw-Hill official said, “People have been talking about the impact of technology on education for 25 years. It feels like it is really going to happen in 2010.” However, he added, “nobody knows what device will take off, or which ‘killer app’ will drive student adaptations.”

Reposted from the February 3, 2010 ASEE First Bell.


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