Archive for the 'Mechanical Engineering' Category

Alcoa Scholarships for Undergrads at University of Virginia

Dear  second and third year SEAS students,

Welcome back to Grounds and the new semester. I am writing to alert you to scholarships available through our Alcoa Campus Partnership Program.

Knowing that engineers play important roles as innovators and leaders in the American and global economy, Alcoa provides two undergraduate scholarships ($3,500 each) to students who have demonstrated the aptitude to become future leaders in engineering.

Alcoa scholarships are available to all second- and third-year SEAS students, but we encourage students majoring in disciplines of special interest to Alcoa—Engineering Science (Material Science Minor), Mechanical Engineering, or Aerospace Engineering—to apply. We urge women and underrepresented minority students as well as students in the Engineering Business Minor to apply for these awards to ensure a diverse and talented engineering workforce. A scholarship committee of SEAS faculty and Alcoa representatives will select the recipients on a merit basis.

The selection for these scholarships will take place early in the fall of 2013, allowing Alcoa to contact the winners to discuss 2014 summer internship positions.

DEADLINE: 4.59 PM, 9 September 2013

TO APPLY

Please provide FOUR COPIES of the following to Vanessa Pace, Department of Engineering & Society, Thornton A237, vpp@virginia.edu.

+ Application form (available from Ms. Pace)

+ 250-word essay discussing how you would use the scholarship to develop as an engineering leader

+ Unofficial transcript

+ Resume

Please contact me if you have any questions about this exciting opportunity.

Sincerely,
WB Carlson
Director, Engineering Business Programs

Email: wc4p@virginia.edu

 ABOUT ALCOA

Alcoa is the world’s leading producer of primary and fabricated aluminum, as well as the world’s largest miner of bauxite and refiner of alumina. In addition to inventing the modern-day aluminum industry, Alcoa innovation has been behind major milestones in the aerospace, automotive, packaging, building and construction, commercial transportation, consumer electronics and industrial markets over the past 125 years. Aluminum is infinitely recyclable and approximately 75 percent of all of the aluminum ever produced since 1888 is still in active use today. Alcoa employs approximately 61,000 people in 30 countries across the world.

 

ALCOA INTERNSHIPS: http://www.alcoa.com/global/en/careers/campus/internships.asp

Stair Climbing Wheelchair

Japanese Researchers Develop Robotic Wheelchair That Can Climb Stairs.

Popular Science (10/17, Boyle) reports, “Wheels are the most efficient way to get around, but they can’t take you everywhere.” A “new robotic wheelchair designed in Japan can go almost anywhere, however–it can swivel its axles up and down to climb up stairs, onto curbs or over obstacles.” Popular Science explains, “All the user has to do is move a joystick to point it in the desired direction, and the robo-chair figures out what to do. Sensors on its feet detect the distance to nearby obstacles and determine their size. The chair will stabilize itself in the best position to hoist one of its front wheels, like a rider straddling a horse.”

Reposted from the 10/17/12 ASEE First Bell.

Sonic Boom Analysis and its Mitigation

Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering
Fall 2012 Seminar Series
Thursday, September 20   4-5 PM in MEC 341
University of Virginia

Sriram Rallabhandi, Ph.D.,
Senior Research Engineer,
National Institute of Aerospace,
Resident at:
Aeronautics System Analysis Branch,
NASA Langley Research Center

Abstract:

This talk focuses on the recent advances in supersonic aircraft design methodology for the purpose of mitigating the adverse effects of sonic booms generated during supersonic flight. The fundamental aspects of sonic boom prediction are briefly described, followed by advanced sonic boom prediction techniques. Several approaches of aircraft design that attempt to mitigate the sonic boom will be addressed.

Host: Bob Lindberg (rel5za@virginia.edu)

To meet with the speaker: Lori Mohr Pedersen (lmpedersen@virginia.edu)

THE LONG TERM CHALLENGE TO CIVIL AVIATION PROPULSION

Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

Fall 2012 Seminar Series

Thursday, September 13 4-5 pm in MEC – 341

University of Virginia

 

Professor Riti Singh

Department of Power and Propulsion

Cranfield University, UK

The confluence of the growth of civil aviation and the need to limit its impact on climate change is set to bring the aerospace industry to its tryst with destiny. Anticipated large improvements in propulsion systems, airframes and operations are likely to be offset by market growth, not least by increasing demands from the BRIC economies. This presentation will focus on propulsion system developments within civil aviation. A drive to improve thermal and propulsive efficiencies still promises significant improvements. Bio‐mix ‘drop‐in’ fuels are likely in the next 20 years and offer further improvements. In the longer term, we are likely to see a shift to distributed propulsion to further improve both propulsive efficiency and air frame performance. This may result in a few very high‐efficiency generators, to drive a large number of small electric fans. Such a scenario opens up the possibility of significant advances with the ability to have ‘clean air frames’. In the long term, the growth of civil aviation may have to be curtailed, in spite of growing market demand. A way forward could be the combination of hydrogen and other technologies, including the intriguing possibility of an aircraft being able to produce global warming or cooling at will, perhaps allowing mankind to control the earth’s temperature by the use of civil aviation.

 Professor Riti Singh

Riti Singh is Professor Emeritus of Cranfield University. He leads the Gas Turbine Engineering & Technology Group within the Department of Power and Propulsion and is Director of the Rolls‐Royce University Technology Centre in Performance Engineering. He has given many plenary/keynote speeches. He holds numerous patents, and has published widely. His research has been strongly supported by industry, the European Union and EPSRC. Professor Singh has an interest in novel cycles for power and propulsion, particularly in the context of the environment. He has received many accolades during the course of his career, the most recent being ASME’s International Gas Turbine Institute’s Annual International Aircraft Engine Technology Award for 2010, presented to one individual each year for sustained, innovative personal contribution to the field. Professor Singh is a past chairman of the Aerospace Division and continues his involvement s a board member of this and the International Society of Air Breathing Engines. (ISABE).Professor Singh has consulted for over 40 organisations, including gas turbine manufacturers.

Control of Large Wind Turbines

Please attend the Lockheed-Martin sponsored ASSET seminar in Thornton Hall, Room E316, the University of Virginia, at 3:00 PM on Friday September 14, 2012.

Prof. Mark Balas, “Control of Large Wind Turbines: It Doesn’t Take a Weatherman to Know Which Way the Wind Blows”

Abstract: The next generation of utility-scale wind turbines will be larger and more flexible than earlier designs to promote greater energy capture and reduce the cost of energy.  It is here that the implementation of active feedback control is crucial to meet design objectives.  Not only must there be power regulation or optimization but also load mitigation to extend the life of the turbine.  Wind turbine dynamics modeling for active control is composed of four principal parts: (1) Aerodynamics and Inflow Behavior (2) Structural Dynamics (3) Feedback Control Algorithms and (4) Power Electronics.  Active control is a relatively new technology for wind turbines.  Basic control theory used in this talk is linear time-invariant and periodic control using disturbance accommodation, but with a strong connection to the aerodynamics and structural dynamics of wind turbines.  This talk will be a non-specialist’s tutorial on control of large wind turbines but will also introduce our adaptive control work in this research area.  I hope, when we are done, no one will ever be able to “kick sand in your face” about utility-sized wind turbine control.

This seminar is a great opportunity to broaden your base of knowledge, which can help spark new ideas in your own research, and could be invaluable in job interviews.  The Q&A based Fireside Chat session will be useful to learn best-current practices. Plan some questions for this distinguished faculty member.

More info:

Malathi Veeraraghavan

Professor, Charles L. Brown Dept. of Elec. & Comp. Engineering University of Virginia

1-434-982-2208

1-203-904-3724 (cell)

http://www.ece.virginia.edu/mv

Revolutionary Aerospace Systems Concepts – Academic Linkage (RASC-AL) Competition

Revolutionary Aerospace Systems Concepts – Academic Linkage (RASC-AL) is a student design competition that is sponsored by NASA and managed by the National Institute of Aerospace.  RASC-AL was formed to provide university-level engineering students with the opportunity to design projects based on NASA engineering challenges as well as offer NASA access to new research and design projects by students.

RASC-AL is open to undergraduate and graduate university-level students studying fields with applications to human space exploration (i.e., aerospace, bio-medical, electrical, and mechanical engineering; and life, physical, and computer sciences).  RASC-AL projects allow students to incorporate their coursework into real aerospace design concepts and work together in a team environment. Interdisciplinary teams are encouraged.

Through RASC-AL, student teams and their faculty advisors will work to develop mission architectures to employ innovative solutions in response to one of the 3 following themes:
  • Near Earth Asteroid (NEA) Flexible Mission Architecture Designs
  • Human-Focused Mars Mission Systems and Technologies
  • Human Lunar Access and Initial Exploration
BRAND NEW WAY TO PARTICIPATE IN 2013!

Teams can choose to participate in RASC-AL in one of two different ways:
  1. By developing a complete, integrated, end-to-end architecture addressing one of the three themes listed above (the traditional option); OR
  2. By performing a thorough system design of a supporting element such as a mobility system, habitat or lander (the advanced concept option).
In 2013, up to eighteen will be chosen to compete at the RASC-AL Forum in Cocoa Beach, Florida. Each team will receive a travel stipend to help defray the cost of attending the RASC-AL Forum. The teams with the top two winning papers will be invited to present their design projects to industry experts at a major Aerospace conference, such as Space 2013 (additional travel stipends provided).
Interested in RASC-AL?  Click here for more details.

Clean Energy Competition

Have an idea for developing new energy technologies?

Want to show off UVa’s entrepreneurial talent?

As part of the Obama Administration’s effort to support the next generation of American clean energy entrepreneurs, the Department of Energy is offering $2 million to student-entrepreneurs for new clean energy solutions.  These funds will be awarded through a series of five regional competitions around the country.
Students at UVa and other universities in the Southeast are invited to compete in the ACC Clean Energy Challenge.  The winner of this challenge will receive a $100,000 prize and compete in the DOE National Clean Energy Business Plan Finals in Washington, D.C., in summer 2012.

To enter, you or your team should register at www.accnrg.org.

Key Dates and Steps:

23 March 2012      Executive Summary (3 pages) and an Investor Video Pitch (3-5 minutes) due.  (During this preliminary round, students compete with other teams from their university.)

10 April   Teams notified of advancement to Southeast Regional Competition.

20 April        Full Commercialization Plans due.

24-25 April    Fifteen teams gather at the University of Maryland to make 20-minute presentations and compete for top prizes.

For complete rules, visit http://www.mtech.umd.edu/accnrg/rules.html.

If you are a UVa student and planning to submit an entry, please contact Prof. Bernie Carlson, wc4p@virginia.edu, so that he can keep track of UVa’s participation.


RSS Feed

August 2017
S M T W T F S
« Sep    
 12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
2728293031