Archive for October 17th, 2012

Memory Technology Scaling and Big Data

SPEAKER:                 Hillery Hunter

TOPIC:                       Can We Really Have That Many Bits? Memory Technology Scaling As It Collides With The Big Data Era

DATE:                        Wednesday, October 24

TIME:                         2:00 p.m. (Light refreshments after the seminar – Rice Hall 4th floor atrium)

PLACE:                      Rice Hall Auditorium (Room 130), University of Virginia

Abstract:  As computer architecture and system design move past the initial phases of the multi-core and virtualization eras, another hurdle is arising: Big Data.  Driven by ubiquitous data generation, from our smart phones and social media postings to security cameras and traffic sensors, Big Data means not just having but also analyzing large amounts of information.  The workloads of this new era will add stress to the main memory system, right around the time that technology scaling encounters new hurdles.  The “End of Scaling” has been declared numerous times — is this time any different?  From the lens of Big Data, this talk will take a look at memory technology scalability, discuss the opportunities of 3D stacking and new memory technologies, highlight key server requirements, and pose important areas for research in the coming era.

Bio: Hillery Hunter is the Systems Memory Strategist and Manager of the Systems Technology and Architecture Department at IBM’s T.J. Watson Research Center in Yorktown Heights, NY.  Her current work focuses on integrated approaches to solving the memory challenges of future computing systems.

Stair Climbing Wheelchair

Japanese Researchers Develop Robotic Wheelchair That Can Climb Stairs.

Popular Science (10/17, Boyle) reports, “Wheels are the most efficient way to get around, but they can’t take you everywhere.” A “new robotic wheelchair designed in Japan can go almost anywhere, however–it can swivel its axles up and down to climb up stairs, onto curbs or over obstacles.” Popular Science explains, “All the user has to do is move a joystick to point it in the desired direction, and the robo-chair figures out what to do. Sensors on its feet detect the distance to nearby obstacles and determine their size. The chair will stabilize itself in the best position to hoist one of its front wheels, like a rider straddling a horse.”

Reposted from the 10/17/12 ASEE First Bell.


RSS Feed

October 2012
S M T W T F S
« Sep   Aug »
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
28293031