DNA for Microchips

Excerpt from ASEE First Bell, August 18, 2009:

 CNET (8/18, Crothers) reports, “On Monday, IBM researchers and collaborator Paul W.K. Rothemund, of the California Institute of Technology (CalTech), announced an advancement of a method to arrange DNA origami structures on surfaces compatible with today’s semiconductor manufacturing equipment.” Spike Narayan, a manager in the Science & Technology division of IBM Research, stated that “the cost involved in shrinking (chip) features to improve performance is a limiting factor in keeping pace with Moore’s Law and a concern across the semiconductor industry.”      NewsFactor Business Report (8/18, LeClaire) reports that the “scientific advancement…could make way for the semiconductor industry to build more powerful, faster, tinier, more energy-efficient computer chips.” Rothemund and the IBM researchers “reported an advancement in combining lithographic patterning with self-assembly. This method of arranging DNA origami structures on surfaces compatible with today’s semiconductor manufacturing equipment could reduce production costs.”    PC Advisor (8/17, Shah) reported, “Big Blue is researching ways in which DNA can arrange itself into patterns on the surface of a chip, and then act as a kind of scaffolding on to which millions of tiny carbon nanotubes and nanoparticles are deposited.” That network, said IBM scientists, “could act as the wires and transistors on future computer chips.”   ITnews (8/18, Williams), and Silicon Republic (8/17, Kennedy) also reported the story.

Advertisements

RSS Feed

August 2009
S M T W T F S
« Jul   Sep »
 1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
3031  

%d bloggers like this: